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Consular Visa Forms

By  usembassy.org.uk 


  All of the forms listed below are in PDF format and require
Adobe Acrobat Reader to view them.
Last updated: 09/16/2008 07:04:34


Form Name Description Section DS-156

Nonimmigrant Visa Application Form NIV DS-156e

Supplemental Application for Treaty Traders & Investors

NIV DS-156k

Supplemental Application for Fiancé(e)s NIV/IV DS-157

Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Application Form NIV DS-158

Contact Information and Work History For Nonimmigrant Visa Applicant NIV DS-230-I Part I

Biographic Data Form for Immigrant, Fiancé(e), and Kii Visa Applicants IV DS-2000

Evidence Which May Be Presented to Meet the Public Charge Provisions of the Law by Applicants for a Fiancé(e), V or Kii Visa IV DS-2001

Applicant's Declaration of Qualification for Immigrant Visa Interview IV DS-3052

Biographic Data Form for V Visa Applicants IV G-325A

USCIS Biographic Information IV/USCIS I-129F

Petition for Alien Fiancé(e) & Kii Visa Applicant IV/USCIS I-130

Petition for Alien Relative IV/USCIS I-134

Affidavit of Support for Fiancé(e), V and Kii Visa Applicants IV/USCIS I-140

USCIS Petition for Employment Immigrants IV/USCIS I-360

Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er) or Special Immigrants IV/USCIS I-526

Immigrant Petition for Alien Entrepeneur IV/USCIS I-765

Application for Employment Authorization IV/USCIS I-864

Affidavit of Support Package for Family Based Immigrant Visa Applicants IV/USCIS IV-15

Document Checklist for K Visa Applicants NIV/IV IV-15V

Document Checklist for Spouses and Children of Lawful Permanent Residents Applying for V Visas IV NIV-30

Credit Card Payment Form for Visa Issuance Fee NIV NIV-30b

Credit Card Payment Form for MRV Fee by mail NIV NIV-30ins

Credit Card Payment Form for Immigrant Visa Petition, Form I-130 NIV VCU-01

Personal Data Sheet NIV

 

How to Choose Between a K3 Visa and a CR-1/IR-1 Visa

By J McFayden, eHow Editor

Both the K3 and CR-1/IR1 visas allow your foreign spouse to enter the U.S. and reside with you permanently. While the outcome is the same, there are some significant differences between the two that should be considered before applying. Read through the following points to help you choose the visa that’s best for you and your family.

Instructions Step11 The K3 visa is classified as a non-immigrant visa while the CR-1/IR-1 visa is classified as an immigrant visa. This means that the CR-1/IR-1 visa holder enters the U.S. as a permanent resident while the K3 visa holder must make an application after entry to adjust status to permanent resident.

Step22The CR-1/IR-1 visa holder can work immediately upon entry to the U.S. with no restrictions. K3 visa holders must apply for employment authorization or wait until they receive a green card before accepting employment. Step33Although the CR-1/IR-1 visa holder benefits by entering the U.S. as a permanent resident, the approval process can be significantly longer for a CR-1/IR-1 visa than a K3 visa, meaning a longer separation for the couple. Step44Both types of visas allow travel outside the U.S. and re-entry. The CR-1/IR-1 visa holder receives a green card allowing open travel and the K3 visa is a multi-entry visa, meaning the holder may travel outside the U.S. for up to two years, or until permanent residence is approved. Step55After arriving in the U.S., if the K3 marriage fails before adjustment of status is complete, the visa holder must leave the U.S. CR-1/IR-1 visa holders receive permanent resident status upon entry and can remain in the U.S. regardless of marital status. Tips & Warnings

Consult U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for the most current policies and procedures, follow instructions provided on the forms and consult an immigration attorney if you have any questions.

Resources U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services


 

 

applying for the IR1/CR1Visa)

US Visas for Spouses Getting your spouse a US visa

American citizens have two means of bringing their foreign husbands or wives to the US to live (if you are not yet married, please visit our section for fiancé(e) visas).

You can "sponsor" your spouse's immigrant visa for entry to the United States. If you follow this process, your foreign spouse will complete the visa process completely outside the US, and then arrive in the US and obtain permanent residency status immediately. You will need to submit an immigrant Petition for Alien Relative, Form I-130. After USCIS, the National Visa Center and the US Embassy complete all the necessary administrative processing your spouse will be granted an immigrant visa. Your spouse will receive an IR1 or a CR1 visa.
(Note: An IR-1 (IR stands for "Immediate Relative") visa allows your spouse to immigrate to the U.S. A CR1 Visa (CR stands for "Conditional Residency") will be given to you if your marriage is less than 2 years old. It is conditional for two years.

You can obtain a K-3 visa. The K3 visa is a non-immigrant visa for the US. K3 visas are granted normally within a few months. You should use the K3 visa to start the process outside of the US, then travel to the US to complete the immigration process. Please note that in this case, the application must be made in the country where the marriage took place. If your marriage took place in the US, your spouse must apply for a K3 visa through the US Embassy in the country of his/her residence. Furthermore, and somewhat confusing – the applicant needs to have form I-129F (called "petition for alien fiancé(e)) also filed on his/her behalf. Since K-3 is a relatively new visa category, USCIS continues to be using the Form I-129F and it is still called a "petition for alien fiancé (e)" rather than a "petition for alien spouse". After the visa has been issued, the spouse can travel to the US.

To obtain either visa, you must meet the following requirements:

You must be legally married. Merely living together does not qualify a marriage for immigration Unmarried partners are ineligible to sponsor visas to the United Stated. In most cases you must have a residence in the US to apply. If you live outside the US, see the next section below. You must be 18 years old before you can sign the Affidavit of Support, which is a form that will be required later in the process.
If you live outside the US If you want to bring your foreign spouse to the US, but you are currently living outside the US, you must submit a visa petition (form I-130) to either your local US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office or directly to the US Embassy where your foreign spouse resides. Please check first if the US Embassy accepts Immigrant Visa Petitions.

Once the visa petition is approved, the foreign-born spouse will receive a packet from the National Visa Center (NVC), which is located in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The packet informs your foreign spouse of the various documents which must be presented at the immigrant visa interview abroad (e.g., passport, police clearances, results of medical examinations, etc.). The packet includes certain documents requesting biographic data that must be completed, signed and forwarded to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate abroad. Usually, the foreign-born spouse is interviewed and granted an immigrant visa within three to six months.

If you and your spouse are planning to remain outside the US indefinitely, it is not recommended that you apply for a Green Card. The Green Card could be cancelled at the Port of Entry to the US if you have spent more than six months outside of the US. The Immigration Officer at the Port of Entry will have to determine if the US is your main home, so be prepared for a lot of questions.

If you both already live in the US

The U.S. citizen must submit a Petition for Alien Relative (form I-130) to appropriate US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office to prove that the marriage is genuine.

Attached to the visa petition are the following items:

Biographical forms (forms G-325A) for both the husband and the wife with photos attached. Proof of the petitioner's citizenship. This can take the form of a U.S. Passport, a Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship or a certified copy of the citizen's birth certificate. A certified copy of the marriage certificate. Certified copies of the documents that terminated any previous marriages of the husband or wife, including final divorce decrees, and certificates of annulment or death.

At the same time, the foreign-born spouse, assuming he or she entered the U.S. lawfully, should submit an application for adjustment of status (form I-485), which is an application for a green card. Normally you will also have to submit form I-485 along with green card photographs, an affidavit of support from the spouse, an application for employment authorization, an application for a travel permit (known as "advanced parole") - assuming the non-citizen spouse has not been in the U.S. unlawfully for 180 days or more - and numerous other USCIS forms.

Frequently Asked Questions We don't want to be apart for so long. What can we do to avoid this? Sometimes in order to avoid a lengthy separation, the couple returns to the U.S. immediately after the marriage (using a visitor visa) and proceeds to file the necessary applications once they are both in the U.S. Often the USCIS does not like this, and it is not uncommon for the USCIS to stop the foreign-born spouse at the Port of Entry and exclude him or her from the U.S. as an intending immigrant. However, if the foreign-born spouse manages to enter the US, USCIS will not deny his or her application for a green card solely because he or she entered the U.S. on a temporary visa when their real intent was to remain permanently in the U.S. You should instead apply for the K-3 visa in order to work and live legally in the US, while waiting your permanent residence.

What about my foreign spouse's children? Spouses of U.S. citizens, and the spouse's children, can come to the United States on nonimmigrant visas (K-4 visas) and wait in the United States to complete the immigration process. Before a K-4 visa can be issued to a child, the parent must have a K-3 visa.

We haven't been married very long. Does that matter? If the marriage is less than two years old when the foreign-born spouse becomes a permanent resident, the green card will expire after a two-year period. Both spouses must submit a joint petition (form I-751) to remove the two-year condition. You should do this 90 days before the Green Card expires.

Our marriage has ended. Can I stay in the US?

If the marriage has ended because you got divorced, your US citizen spouse has died, or due toabuse in the marriage, the foreign-born spouse may eligible to apply for a waiver of the joint petition requirement. However, these waivers are very difficult to get.



 

This page describes how to apply for a work permit.

Remember that in most cases, you have to apply for a work permit from outside Canada. Your employer also has a role in the application process.

If you apply to work temporarily in Quebec, you must meet all the federal requirements and you must get a Certificat d’acceptation du Québec (Certificate of acceptance) from the province.

1. Check the application processing times. How long it takes to process your application varies depending on where you applied. You can check application processing times in the I Need To… section on the right-hand side of this page.

You can speed up the process by:

including all the necessary information with your application notifying the visa office of any changes to the information on your application avoiding unnecessary inquiries to the visa office providing photocopies and documents that are clear and legible providing certified English or French translations of documents, where required, and applying from a country where you are a citizen or permanent resident.
Your application will take longer to process if the visa office has to take extra steps to assess your case. For example, extra steps are required if:

there are criminal or security problems with your application your family situation is not clear because of an event, such as a divorce or an adoption that is not yet complete or child custody issues that have not been resolved the local visa office has to consult with other Citizenship and Immigration Canada offices in Canada or abroad you require a medical examination.
2. Obtain an application package. The package includes the application guide and all the forms you need to fill out. Download and print the application package.

Before you fill out the application, you will need:

a written job offer from your employer proof that you meet the requirements of the job (for example, proof of certain education or work experience) and the positive labour market opinion on your job offer from Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), if one is required. In some cases, you can submit your application while you wait for the positive labour market opinion. See Concurrent processing in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.
If you need an HRSDC opinion, it is up to your employer to get it and send it to you. For more information about HRSDC opinions, go to Frequently asked questions in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

Remember, even if HRSDC has given a positive labour market opinion, there is no guarantee that you will get a work permit.

Some jobs do not require an HRSDC opinion. For more information on those jobs, go to Work permit: Who can apply in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. For these jobs you will require:

proof of identity in the form of a valid passport or travel document that guarantees that you will be able to return to the country where it was issued and if you are not a citizen of the country in which you are applying, you must also provide proof of your present immigration status in that country.
After your employer gets confirmation that you can be offered a job, the employer will send you the labour market opinion confirmation letter. You must submit the detailed job offer with the application.

Now you can apply for a work permit at a Canadian mission abroad.

3. Determine where you will submit your application. You must submit your application to the visa office responsible for the country or region where you live. You must have legal status in your country of residence. For a list of visa offices, go to Find a CIC office in the I Need To… section on the right-hand side of this page.

In some cases, you can apply for a work permit when you arrive in Canada, or from within Canada. For details, go to Work permit: Who can apply in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

4. Determine if you need a passport and a temporary resident visa. If you want to work in Canada, you must meet the requirements for a work permit. You must also meet the general requirements for entering Canada. This means that you might also need a passport and a temporary resident visa.

A temporary resident visa is an official document that is placed in your passport. To find out if you need a visa to enter Canada, see the Visit section on the left-hand side of this page.

If you require a temporary resident visa, you do not have to apply for it separately or pay a separate fee. If your work permit is approved, the visa will be issued at the same time as the documentation you need to enter Canada as a worker.

If you are a citizen or a permanent resident of the United States, Greenland or Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon, you do not need a passport or a temporary resident visa to enter Canada. You must, however, provide proof of citizenship or permanent residence, such as a national identity card or an alien registration card.

5. Pay the correct processing fee. There is a fee for applying for a work permit.

For current rates, go to Pay my application fees in the I Need To… section on the right-hand side of this page. In many countries, the fee can be paid in the local currency.

Check the website of the visa office responsible for the country or region where you live for more information on fees, including how to pay them.

Your fee will not be refunded, even if your application is not accepted.

6. Submit the application form. Once you are sure your application form is complete, sign and date it, and check that you have included all the required documents and fees. Make sure you have the right receipt for the fees.

Remember, your application will be returned to you if it is not properly completed or if documents are missing.

 

Bringing your Fiance(e) to the US
If you are a US citizen planning to marry someone who is not a US citizen in the United States, your fiancé(e) will need a visa to enter the United States. Specifically, you will need a K-1 visa, which will allow you to get married and then pursue permanent residency. Please read our Frequently Asked Questions section for additional information.

Applying for the K-1 visa [Fiance(e) visa]

To apply for the K-1 visa, the procedure is as follows:

Form I-129F Petition for Alien Fiancé(e) should be submitted to USCIS. If your fiancé(e) has unmarried children who are under 21, they are eligible to accompany your fiancé(e), but only if they are listed on this form. See our section on obtaining a visa for minor children. Show proof of your U.S. citizenship. Submit 2 Form G-325A Biographic Data Sheets (one for you and one for your fiancé(e)) plus color photos of each of you. A copy of any divorce decrees, death certificates, or annulment decrees if either of you were previously married. Proof of permission to marry if you or your fiancé(e) are subject to any age restrictions (age restrictions vary from state to state).
You and your fiancé(e) must fulfill several requirements in order to be considered for the K-1 visa, such as:

You must both be free to marry (ie both of you are single, divorced, etc) You must have met your fiancé(e) in person at least one time in the past two years. You can prove this by showing photographs of the two of you together, airline tickets, etc. This can be waived if you can prove that meeting would have created hardship, or meeting would have gone against traditional or cultural custom in your fiancé(e)'s home country. It is important to note that if your fiancé(e) is given the visa, you must get married within 90 of his or her arrival in the US, or your fiancé(e) will have to leave. Your fiancé(e) may not be given another US visa if this happens. The visa cannot be extended beyond 90 days. Your fiancé(e) also must marry the K-1 petitioner (you) and no one else in order to remain in the US.

Frequently Asked Questions After we get married, will my spouse be allowed to work in the US? After you get married, you must apply for an Adjustment of Status, Form I-485, to become a permanent resident. You will also need to apply for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD).



Can my fiancé(e) work after arriving in the US but before we get married? After arriving in the United States, your fiancé(e) may apply for an employment authorization using Form I-765. However, the employment authorization may not be processed within the 90-day time limit for you to get married.If your fiancé(e) applies for adjustment to permanent resident status, your fiancé(e) must re-apply for a new employment authorization after the marriage.



If we don't get married, can my fiancé(e) remain in the US? You must get married within 90 of his or her arrival in the US, or your fiancé(e) will have to leave. Your fiancé(e) may not be given another US visa if this happens. The visa cannot be extended beyond 90 days. Your fiancé(e) also must marry the K-1 petitioner (you) and no one else in order to remain in the US.



After my fiancé(e) arrives in the US, how long do we have before we have to get married? You must get married within 90 days.



Our petition for a visa was denied. What can we do to appeal the decision? Usually you have 33 days to appeal once you have received the decision by mail. The appeal must be filed with the office that made the decision.



 

 

United States Visa for Medical Treatment(s

If applicant is visiting the United Sates for medical reasons, you can enter the United States on a B-2 visitor visa. Like a visitor for pleasure, you must apply for a visa and demonstrate your visa eligibility.

B2 Visa Qualifications

The U.S. consular officer decides if the applicant is eligible to enter the United States or not.  The following is the qualification criteria by which the consular will grant the visitor visa.

It is a presumption that every visitor visa applicant is an intending immigrant (has an intention to stay back in the U.S. permanently). Therefore, applicants for visitor visas must overcome this presumption by demonstrating that:

The purpose of their trip is to enter the U.S. for business, pleasure, or medical treatment.
That they plan to remain for a specific and limited period.
Evidence of funds to cover expenses in the United States;
Evidence of compelling social and economic ties abroad; and
That they have a residence outside the U.S. as well as other binding ties which will insure their return abroad at the end of the visit.
Visa for Medical Treatment Application Procedure

Step 1:  Make an interview appointment.
Interview at the embassy consular section is required for applicants age 14 through 79. For children 13 and younger and people 80 and older most of the time do not require an interview, unless requested otherwise.

Wait times for interview appointments and visa processing time information for each U.S. Embassy or Consulate worldwide can be found on the United States Department of State website.

Step 2: Interview

See visa required documents that need to be brought to the visitor visa interview.

Step 2: Fingerprinting
A quick, two-digit, ink-free fingerprint scan will be taken, most likely during the interview.

Step 3: Additional Screening
Some applicants will require additional screening and will be notified so when applying for the Visa. These clearances may take several weeks or longer. Please plan for the possibility of a delay in the issuance of a visa. Make your visa application well in advance of your intended travel.

Required Documents for the Interview

Each applicant must have the following documents for the interview:

Application Form DS-156 completed and signed. 
Option 1: Download, print and fill out the form and bring to the interview
Option 2.  Fill out the form online and submit is on-line.     
Note: You still need to bring a printed copy of the application form to the interview. Current and valid passport or travel document Your Photograph
Requirements are strict for photograph size, type and quality.
See details for photograph requirements Application fees. Link to fee page here
All applicants must pay the application fee. Some applicants, according to nationality and type of visa, must also pay an issuance fee.
See Details on Appliction and Issuance Fees Evidence of funds to cover your expenses in the United States Evidence of compelling social and economic ties abroad
In addition to the standard visitor visa requirements, you need to bring the following information about your medical treatment:

A diagnosis from a doctor about your medical condition.
The doctor must explain why you must go to the U.S. for medical treatment. A letter from a doctor or hospital in the United States stating the following: Statement of willingness to treat your medical condition, Estimate of the costs of the treatment, including doctor's fees, costs of hospitalization and other medical expenses and, Estimate of length of treatment.
Proof that you (or your sponsor) have sufficient funds to pay your travel and medical expenses in the United States. (This can be in the form of bank account statements, etc.)
Note: It is important to note that individuals suffering certain afflictions, e.g. contagious diseases, may be ineligible according to the United States Immigration and Nationality Act to receive visas. Person may apply but approval is not assured.

Where to Apply for the Visitor Visa?

Applicants for visitor visas should generally apply at the American Embassy or Consulate with jurisdiction over their place of permanent residence. Although visa applicants may apply at any U.S. consular office abroad, it may be more difficult to qualify for the visa outside the country of permanent residence.

Find the nearest United States consulate to you

Visa Denial or Refusal

If the consular officer should find it necessary to deny the issuance of a visitor visa, the applicant may apply again if there is new evidence to overcome the basis for the refusal. In the absence of new evidence, consular officers are not obliged to re-examine such cases. 



 





 

B2 Visa Qualifications

The U.S. consular officer decides if the applicant is eligible to enter the United States or not.  The following is the qualification criteria by which the consular will grant the visitor visa.

It is a presumption that every visitor visa applicant is an intending immigrant (has an intention to stay back in the U.S. permanently). Therefore, applicants for visitor visas must overcome this presumption by demonstrating that:

The purpose of their trip is to enter the U.S. for business, pleasure, or medical treatment.
That they plan to remain for a specific and limited period.
Evidence of funds to cover expenses in the United States;
Evidence of compelling social and economic ties abroad; and
That they have a residence outside the U.S. as well as other binding ties which will insure their return abroad at the end of the visit.
You May not Need a Visitor Visa if... Foreign travelers who are citizens from certain eligible countries, may not need Visitor/Business visa to visit the U.S. They can enter USA without a visa under the Visa Waiver Program. They can enter into the United States up to 90 days with the Visa Waiver Program.

The following countries participate in the Visa Waiver Program:
Andorra, Austria, Australia, Belgium, Brunei, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (For citizens with the unrestricted right of permanent abode in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

Find out more about the Visa Waiver Program

 Methods of Sponsorship

1. Sponsored Trip:
If applicant's has child or relatives lies in USA, they can sponsor the visa for the applicant.

Sponsor: Any US based person can sponsor visa for his/her parents, relatives, friends.

Liabilities of sponsor: Sponsor needs to provide affidavit of support form stating and assuring to take the liabilities of expenses required for applicant’s trip.

Other then this they also need to provide some other documents required to support their claim as sponsor.

Sponsoring does not guarantee the visa grant. Individual applying for visa must meet the criteria, set for US visitor visa.

2. Self Sponsored:
You can be a self sponsor for your trip. You must have sufficient funds and proof of financial capability that can justify your trip expenses.

Visitor Visa Application Procedure

Step 1:  Make an interview appointment.
Interview at the embassy consular section is required for applicants age 14 through 79. For children 13 and younger and people 80 and older most of the time do not require an interview, unless requested otherwise.

Wait times for interview appointments and visa processing time information for each U.S. Embassy or Consulate worldwide can be found on the United States Department of State website.

Step 2: Interview
See visa required documents that need to be brought to the visitor visa interview.

Step 2: Fingerprinting
A quick, two-digit, ink-free fingerprint scan will be taken, most likely during the interview.
Learn more about Visa Fingerprinting

Step 3: Additional Screening
Some applicants will require additional screening and will be notified so when applying for the Visa. These clearances may take several weeks or longer. Please plan for the possibility of a delay in the issuance of a visa. Make your visa application well in advance of your intended travel.

Required Documents for the Interview

Each applicant must have the following documents for the interview:

Application Form DS-156 completed and signed. 
Option 1: Download, print and fill out the form and bring to the interview
Option 2.  Fill out the form online and submit is on-line.     
Note: You still need to bring a printed copy of the application form to the interview. Current and valid passport or travel document Your Photograph
Requirements are strict for photograph size, type and quality.
See details for photograph requirements Application fees
All applicants must pay the application fee. Some applicants, according to nationality and type of visa, must also pay an issuance fee.
See Details on Appliction and Issuance Fees Evidence of funds to cover your expenses in the United States Evidence of compelling social and economic ties abroad
Where to Apply for the Visitor Visa?

Applicants for visitor visas should generally apply at the American Embassy or Consulate with jurisdiction over their place of permanent residence. Although visa applicants may apply at any U.S. consular office abroad, it may be more difficult to qualify for the visa outside the country of permanent residence.

Find the nearest United States consulate to you

Visa Denial or Refusal

If the consular officer should find it necessary to deny the issuance of a visitor visa, the applicant may apply again if there is new evidence to overcome the basis for the refusal. In the absence of new evidence, consular officers are not obliged to re-examine such cases.
Learn more about Visa Denials or Refusals

 

B1 Business Visa Qualifications

The U.S. consular officer decides if the applicant is eligible to enter the United States or not.  The following is the qualification criteria by which the consular will grant the visitor visa.

It is a presumption that every visitor visa applicant is an intending immigrant (has an intention to stay back in the U.S. permanently). Therefore, applicants for visitor visas must overcome this presumption by demonstrating that:

The purpose of their trip is to enter the U.S. for business, pleasure, or medical treatment.
That they plan to remain for a specific and limited period.
Evidence of funds to cover expenses in the United States;
Evidence of compelling social and economic ties abroad; and
That they have a residence outside the U.S. as well as other binding ties which will insure their return abroad at the end of the visit.
Business Visa Application Procedure

Step 1:  Make an interview appointment.
Interview at the embassy consular section is required for applicants age 14 through 79. For children 13 and younger and people 80 and older most of the time do not require an interview, unless requested otherwise.

Wait times for interview appointments and visa processing time information for each U.S. Embassy or Consulate worldwide can be found on the United States Department of State website.

Step 2: Interview
See visa required documents that need to be brought to the visitor visa interview.

Step 2: Fingerprinting
A quick, two-digit, ink-free fingerprint scan will be taken, most likely during the interview.

Step 3: Additional Screening
Some applicants will require additional screening and will be notified so when applying for the Visa. These clearances may take several weeks or longer. Please plan for the possibility of a delay in the issuance of a visa. Make your visa application well in advance of your intended travel.

Required Documents for the Interview

Each applicant must have the following documents for the interview:

Application Form DS-156 completed and signed. 
Option 1: Download, print and fill out the form and bring to the interview
Option 2.  Fill out the form online and submit is on-line.     
Note: You still need to bring a printed copy of the application form to the interview. Current and valid passport or travel document Your Photograph
Requirements are strict for photograph size, type and quality.
See details for photograph requirements Application fees
All applicants must pay the application fee. Some applicants, according to nationality and type of visa, must also pay an issuance fee.
See Details on Appliction and Issuance Fees Evidence of funds to cover your expenses in the United States
Where to Apply for the Business Visa?

Applicants for visitor visas should generally apply at the American Embassy or Consulate with jurisdiction over their place of permanent residence. Although visa applicants may apply at any U.S. consular office abroad, it may be more difficult to qualify for the visa outside the country of permanent residence.

Find the nearest United States consulate to you

Visa Denial or Refusal

If the consular officer should find it necessary to deny the issuance of a visitor visa, the applicant may apply again if there is new evidence to overcome the basis for the refusal. In the absence of new evidence, consular officers are not obliged to re-examine such cases.